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This is an image heavy post, so please have patience as it loads. I hope you’ll agree it’s worth it!

The ocean may be the body of water that defines many South East Asian nations, but not this one. Cambodia is dominated by another feature, a great lake- The Tonle Sap. The lake serves as the home, livelihood, and source of food for countless Cambodians. During the wet season, the lake swells to be one of the largest in all of Asia, over 7,400 square miles.Ā  Nearly half the fish consumed in Cambodia come from this very lake, which holds over 200 species. Most famously it is home not only to wildlife but also to enormous communities that take residence in floating villages and stilted homes. While I missed a visit to the Tonle Sap during my 2009 visit, I knew that as much as the temples of Angkor and the killing fields of Phnom Penh, this was a living breathing piece of Cambodian history. And while planning this trip to Siem Reap I vowed to visit the Great Lake.

kompong khleang

There are three main areas open to visitors: touristy and easily accessed Chong Kneas, floating village Kampong Phluk, and stilted community of Kompong Khleang. Along with Tara River Boat Tours, I visited Kompong Khleang, the most remote and least visited of the villages, as well as the largest one of the lake.

kampong khleang

Our journey started with a long drive along the north side of the lake, during which our group of 7 got acquainted and met our guide, Mr. Sopond. One thing I like about Tara tours is that most of the guides were themselves born in the villages that they provide tours of. Mr. Sopond had excellent English and answered many of the questions about Cambodian life that had gone unanswered so far on my trip.

kampong khleang

When we arrived at the dock we were led into a small but comfortable boat that would be taking us around the lake. As you may be aware, Cambodia is in the midst of recovering from some of the worst flooding in decades, and we were about to visit a heavily affected area. In fact, as we boarded the boat our guide warned us that we would be seeing much less activity that usual, as most of the houses had been abandoned in the wake of the floods. Any disappointment we might have felt at an abbreviated tour was made trivial by the thought of the amount of people forced to flee their homes and livelihoods.

kampong khleang

Still, there was a steady hum of activity as we entered Kompong Khleang. A full fledged community, we saw not just houses but small businesses…

kampong khleang

a grand temple…

kampong khleang

and means of employment such as fish and alligator farms. I had to remind myself we were floating on a massive body of water when I saw pet dogs and pigs hanging out on balconies, and bicycles and motorbikes parked precariously inside houses.

kampong khleang

One of the most interesting bits of information Mr. Sopond shared was that there is a serious class divide between those with floating houses, who tend to be poorer, and those with stilted homes, who tend to be more financially comfortable. However, with the flooded lake reaching more than 15 meters, it was those with stilted homes that were forced to abandon them for dry land. In the wet season, the lakes usually reaches to about 10 meters, while in the dry season the tour forgoes a boat and drives through the village, with the stilted homes towering above.

kampong khleang

At one point another boat with two tourists floated by and I was reminded we weren’t the only foreigners there. Mr. Sopond told me that there are on average less than 10 visitors per day. “What about the high season?” I inquired. He thought about it. “Maybe 15.”

kampong khleang

This is in stark contrast to other Tonle Sap villages such as Chong Kneas, which is overwhelmed by hundreds of foreign visitors per day. Here in Kompong Khleang, we were still enough of a novelty to warrant waves and enthusiastic “hellos!” from children coming running out onto the balconies of their floating homes.

kampong khleang

What was more interesting than the floating and stilted structures were the people. After spending six collective months of my life in Southeast Asia I’m no longer shocked by how modern everything seems to be. Rather, I’m delighted when I find a pocket of this region that still seems somehow untouched by the rest of the world. The Tonle Sap river seems to be one of these places where time stands still.

kampong khleang

kampong khleang

Boats serve not only as homes, but also as vehicles. For a heavily abandoned village, there were many boats on the water. I can imagine that there must be a traffic jam of sorts on more typical days.

kampong khleang

I’m also pretty sure, based on the ages of the drivers, that no driver’s licenses are needed for these vehicles.

kampong khleang

kampong khleang

kampong khleang

Unfortunately, do to the flooding, our boat was unable to enter the “Main Street” of the village, as it would have tangled in the sole electrical wire stringing through the passage. So we pulled up at the man made island that houses the village temple and school in order to charter a smaller boat and get a bit more up close and personal.

kampong khleang

We found that the temple grounds also serve as an impromptu playground for village kids craving a patch of ground to run around on.

kampong khleang

kampong khleang

School is in session 6 days a week, and sadly we visited on the children’s day off, so we didn’t donate school supplies as mentioned in the tour’s description. But while our guide was chartering a boat, we garnered the attention of the few local kids who now live at the school after the flooding financially devastated their families.

kampong khleang

The older ones seemed stoic and tried to play it cool, while the little ones went bonkers, running around shrieking and showing off.

kampong khleang

Some of them expressed interest in my camera, so I took a few snapshots of them and showed them the images. These girls went shrieking and running in circles and continued to vamp for shots. Sometimes I feel a bit like a voyeur and get too shy or uncomfortable to take pictures of people, so it was thrilling to have such willing models.

kampong khleang

This was a refreshing chance to interact with Cambodian children who weren’t asking for money, and one of the highlights of my visit to the Tonle Sap. When Mr. Sopond returned with a small boat willing to take us for a spin, the kids gathered by the water’s edge and waved goodbye.

kampong khleang

kampong khleang

In our new, more low-profile boat, we were able to see the devastation wrought by the flooding more clearly.

kampong khleang

kampong khleang

Those who’s homes were simple a meter or two underwater rather than completely submerged exhibited typical South East Asian ingenuity and simply built a second floor above the flood water. It’s this kind of make-do attitude that makes me love this part of the world so much.

Kampong Khleang

With that, our tour had come to an end. Based on our early finishing time and comments from our guide, I believe that many parts of the tour had to be skipped due to the current conditions of the river. However, it was still an eye-opening and fascinating tour led by a friendly and professional guide, and an experience of this trip that I won’t forget anytime soon. I feel lucky to have seen a part of Cambodia that relatively few people have been to, and to be able to better understand the current events happening during my visit. Anyone can read about financial damage and displacement statistics, but seeing abandoned villages and homeless children first hand gave me a more visceral understanding of the devastation. But if there is one thing Cambodia excels at, it’s survival, and I have no doubt that the people of this country will recover from this natural disaster with grace.

Kampong Khleang

At $72 per person, this is not a budget tour. But it does include hotel pick up, all guide and driver services, and supports a company that is dedicated to giving back to and supporting the communities on the lake. Those on a budget can still visit the Tonle Sap by choosing a visit to one of the closer villages at a much more affordable price. You can learn more and book through www.taraboat.com or with any travel agent in Siem Reap.

To see all my pictures from the Tonle Sap, visit my Flickr set here.

Full disclosure: For the purpose of reviewing Tara River Boat, I received a complimentary tour.Ā  As always, all thoughts and opinions are my own.

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28 Comments...
  • Roy
    November 13 2011

    I’m really sad I missed this trip when I was in Cambodia. Next time I will look it up for sure!

  • Krista C.
    November 13 2011

    What an awesome experience! The pictures are fabulous. It was so great to see first hand how the people of Cambodia are handling the flooding.

  • Rachael Sena
    November 13 2011

    It’s incredible how they are doing whatever they can to get through this flood. I love how you document your trips with photos, it feels as if I am there with you guys!

    • Alex
      November 14 2011

      Thanks Rachael! I got a tip that this blog needs more images, so I’m going photo crazy! Glad you like it!

  • Erik Smith
    November 13 2011

    This is an amazing post. I have always wanted to do this, now I want to go even more!

    You should be really proud of this post.

    • Alex
      November 14 2011

      Thanks Erik! I enjoyed it so much, if I’m ever back in Siem Reap (and I have a feeling I will be) I would happily do the Kompong Phluck tour next.

  • MarkG
    November 13 2011

    Thank you for bringing this brilliant story to light – and documented so well. This is one of the finest posts that I have read on a Travel blog this year. There must be a prize for this! Please continue.

    • Alex
      November 14 2011

      Wow, what a compliment! I appreciate your kind words very much šŸ™‚

  • Steve McKee
    November 14 2011

    alex:
    good stuff. And yes, the uptick in photos is a plus.
    stv

  • Dad
    November 17 2011

    Alex, I am sorry we didn’t visit this in 2009. Being there in July we would have missed the monsoon season and could seen even more under more routine circumstances. This was an excellent post.

    • Alex
      November 17 2011

      I know, but with only three days we did the right thing soaking in all the temples, and of course relaxing šŸ™‚

  • Max
    April 26 2013

    Wow. I’ve only seen Kompong Khleang during the dry season so far (which shows you how high the water level can get: some of the stilt-houses are about 5 meters high). Can’t wait to see it during the rain season!!
    Max recently posted..Kompong Khleang floating village updated Fri Apr 26 2013 12:19 am EDT

    • Alex
      April 26 2013

      I would love to go back during the dry season! Amazing how it can be like two different worlds.

  • ellie
    July 9 2013

    my name is ellie. i am a middle school student in san francisco. i recently visited the village, Kompong Khleang, I’ve ben collecting school supplies and soccer gear to send to the school. I am looking for a principal or teacher contact to coordinate with. Would there be any chance of you knowing any?

    -Ellie

    • Alex
      July 9 2013

      Hi Ellie! Unfortunately I don’t. However the owner of the company I did the tour with is very well connected in the area. I suggest contacting him, I’m sure he could put you in touch! Best of luck!

      • ellie
        July 10 2013

        Thank you!!!

  • ellie
    July 10 2013

    Could you give me the companies name?

    • Alex
      July 11 2013

      Hey Ellie, see the response from Peter, who just commented as well. Sound like a great contact!

  • peter
    July 11 2013

    Hi Alex,Thanks for the lovely photos and so happy you enjoyed the trip out there,its one of my favorite floating villages,Ellie,my name is peter and i own the tara boat,one of our guides live there so i will ask him if he can give you a contact number or contact details,my email is [email protected]
    i hope this is ok alex to reply like this i just happened to be doing some research on another lake tour we are looking at doing and spotted your lovely post,cheers Peter

    • Alex
      July 11 2013

      Thanks Peter! Glad you could help each other. I miss Cambodia!

  • rio
    November 4 2014

    what do you like about Cambodia alex?

    • Alex
      November 7 2014

      Wow, tough to sum it up succinctly! I guess there is just something intangible about the place that inspires me. The people are resilient and inspiring, the history is tragic yet fascinating, and the geography is a heady mix of beautiful beaches, lovely countryside and interesting cities. Love love love!

  • rio
    November 9 2014

    that’s very wonderful I would love to go there and see for my self it sounds beautiful but I don’t know how id go without electricity. šŸ™‚

    • Alex
      November 13 2014

      I’d last about as long as my laptop charge šŸ™‚

  • shaun
    September 21 2016

    wow

    • Alex
      September 22 2016

      Pretty amazing, right?

  • James
    October 19 2016

    Really enjoying your blog. A lot of insight especially in Cambodia and amazing pictures. Tara was a bit expensive – we went on http://www.kompongkhleang.org which was really nice as well.

    • Alex
      October 23 2016

      Thanks for the recommendation James! Ah, I love Cambodia.

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