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Read Part I here.

I woke up after the second night aboard The Aria so grateful that I was on a four night itinerary — there was no way I’d have been ready to leave the next day! The ship was already beginning to feel like home and I knew I’d soon miss waking up to Amazon floating by my window like a version of a flat screen TV, constantly tuned to National Geographic. The brutal 6am wakeup call that day would allow us to travel by skiffs deep into the Pacaya Ramira Reserve. One of the downsides of traveling the Amazon in the low water season is that the deciduous trees are bare and give the riverbanks a barren look. (An upside is the relative lack of mosquitos — I totaled just one or two scratchy spots throughout the trip.) Not so down this lush tributary.

Aqua Expeditions Excursion

Aqua Expeditions Excursion

Aqua Expeditions Excursion

Once our group — remember, we were named the Chunky Monkeys — started complaining of rumbling stomachs, we tied up the dinghies together and had breakfast bobbing in the water. Aqua Expeditions is all about this kind of unique experience — there’s nothing quite like sipping passionfruit juice while rocking with the slight bob of a boat and watching a hawk swoop overhead. I’d say it was one of my more memorable picnic settings. Soon after taking off again, we heard excited Spanish crackling over the radio. As we joined the other skiffs at the river bank our guide, Neysir, leapt off the boat. Soon, the guides managed to wrestle – and I mean that literally – an anaconda out of its nest along the riverbank. They looked like a couple of kids, which made sense when they revealed to us that anaconda-wrangling was a key component to their boyhood mischief, growing up along these rivers. Sitting in the front seat, feet away from where the anaconda head was thrashing around, I felt I was in a somewhat precarious position. But as the group whooped and cheered, I was swept away in the fun. It was a spectacular sight to see, and a horrible smell to smell.

Anaconda Spotting in the Amazon

Anaconda Spotting in the Amazon

Anaconda Spotting in the Amazon

Eventually we returned the snake to his nest to go about his snake-y business, and continued into the reserve. Again we watched families of monkey play in the trees, and spotted a few sloths curled up like balls in the branches. We found a few caimans lurking in the shallows, but they always slipped beneath the surface before the guide could rush over with a net to repeat their anaconda show. The sky was coated in a thick and stubborn cloud, making for a dramatic and moody setting.

Amazon Caiman

Wildlife Spotting in the Amazon

Wildlife Spotting in the Amazon

We stopped to fish for piranhas, though blessedly it was a shorter activity than it had been at Heliconia. Once again, I was failed spectacularly to catch even the smallest fish while the rest of the group seemed to be qualifying for the piranha-fishing Olympics. Taking pity on me, Nancy insisted that I pose with one of her catches. “No one will ever know!,” she insisted, which might be true had I not just written it here now.

Amazon Piranha Fishing

Amazon Piranha Fishing

One of the catches we saved, and fed to a hawk which swooped down and grabbed its lunch so quickly I only caught his hind feathers through my lens. We spotted so many other birds, including a family of colorful macaws and a group of prehistoric looking Mohawk-rockers. For the first time in my life I heard the distinctive call of the howler monkey, and I truly felt for the first time that I was deep in the jungle. In total, it was almost five hours on the skiff – in my opinion, a little long, though perhaps I would have felt differently had the weather been better. Back on The Aria, the rain only picked up in intensity, and after a lovely meal I spent the afternoon siesta time editing photos from Iquitos and the cruise from the comfort of my bed, with the drapes cast open to watch the rainy world float by.

Bird Hunting in the Amazon

Macaw in the Amazon

After the afternoon lecture I simply couldn’t bring myself to go on the excursion. Instead I continued working and also hit the treadmill for the second time — it may be small, but that little gym has a world class view! Later I heard I hadn’t missed much – it was more of the same from the morning, with the one moment of excitement being a caiman wrestled from the water and brought onboard in the dark of night. I was slightly bummed I missed that, but I had loved my productive and peaceful time aboard The Aria. I did think the days excursions were a bit repetitive, but they may have been limited by weather.

Again, we were treated to a fantastic tasting menu dinner. I simply could not get over the presentation, the tastes and textures, and infusion of local ingredients that came out course after course. But even more than what was on the table, I enjoyed those sitting around it. The passengers onboard The Aria were some of the most well-traveled people I’d ever met, and I loved taking turns getting to know the various couples, families and friend groups onboard. I was closest, of course, to my new surrogate “moms,” as they had previously dubbed themselves. One of the couples was excited to hear that I have three sisters, as they themselves have three daughters. Reminding me of my own father, the dad said he was offended when people ask him if he wanted boys instead, saying daughters are a blessing. “Plus,” he quipped, “have three pretty girls and you’ll have all the boys you want around.” Have I mentioned I really loved my fellow Aria passengers?

Aqua Expeditions Meals

The next morning, I was relieved to see blue skies and see a more active itinerary on the schedule. We started out with a short excursion out to The Black Lake. There, a fleet of dugout canoes commandeered by local village woman were waiting for us. It was a little gimmicky but I enjoyed the chance to practice my Spanish with my local paddling partner, and it is a nice way for Aqua Expeditions to support the local community. Also, getting off the motorized skiff and into a man-powered (or in this case, woman-powered) canoe helped me slow down and appreciate the true pace of The Amazon.

Amazon Dugout Canoe

Amazon Dugout Canoe

Once our arms were good and sore, we had a chance to swim. And of course by “swim” I mean jump in the water, shriek, and exit back onto the boat immediately. On my previous jungle trip I had passed on the swimming, but when all the other members of the Chunky Monkeys jumped in I just couldn’t be upstaged.

Swimming in the Amazon

After a quick stop back on The Aria to change, we departed again for a morning jungle walk. I was excited to get back int0 the rainforest on foot. While the sloth-like traveler in me loved sitting on the skiffs and lazily looking in the direction the guide points, I think the best sightings (and photographs!) come from being up close and personal. We were on the hunt for giant water lilies, which had been kind of a letdown on my first jungle trip. Here, not so – they were massive and lush, and situated in an Eden-like clearing in the jungle.

Giant Lilly Pads in the Amazon

Giant Lilly Pads in the Amazon

Aqua Expeditions Excursion

Amazon Grasshopper

Towards the end of our walk, already feeling fairly satisfied by spottings of bushy black jungle squirrels and blue morpho butterflies, I excitedly called out to the group that I had found a walking stick bug. Our guide was skeptical until he spotted it with his own eyes, at which point his tone turned congratulatory. Perhaps there is a future as a naturalist guide ahead of me yet!

Praying Mantis in the Peruvian Amazon

Praying Mantis in the Peruvian Amazon

It was a great find, slightly one upped by the small yellow tree boa snake that the guide ahead of us stumbled upon while trying to nab a tree frog. We went running when we heard the excited cries ahead of us, and were rewarded with an up-close look at a coiled, golden-hued serpent.

Aqua Expeditions Excursion

Tree Boa Amazon

Tree Boa Amazon

Though it might seem we had already done enough to fill a full day, after lunch and siesta time we headed out once again. This time our destination was a local village, one of the forty or so Aqua Expeditions rotates between visiting. We were invited, pre-departure, to bring school supplies to the children living there, and we were lucky enough to meet a few of them. The small group shyly introduced themselves and then proceeded to repeat each of our names along with a clap for each syllable, as we introduced ourselves right back.

Aqua Expeditions Local Village Visit

Broken into small groups, we were each invited into a community members’ home. I always find it fascinating to see how people live around the world. The family I visited had a large wooden house, however for three months of the year, during the peak of the high water season, the entire family is relegated to a small loft in the back of the house – the rest of it is simply flooded. It reminded me greatly of the communities I had seen living along the Tonle Sap river in Cambodia.

As we left, I heard someone asked if we should give our hosts money as a thank you, and the guide replied it was better to support the wife by buying some of her handicrafts — an answer I much appreciated. They village woman had gathered to sell jewelry and other souvenirs, the most creative of which being handmade paintings of The Aria for just 50 soles. I was wildly impressed with their entrepreneurial spirit, and wished I had had enough cash on me to buy one. Instead, I bought simple strings of beads that will add to my global (and already overflowing) jewelry collection.

Aqua Expeditions Local Village Visit

Aqua Expeditions Local Village Visit

Aqua Expeditions Local Village Visit

We waved goodbye and our skiffs sped off into the middle of the Amazon, just as the sun dipped below the riverbanks. This was it — our final sunset on the river, and our final night on The Aria. Mimosas were passed around while the group chatted like the old friends we’d quickly become. I looked around and saw happy people. Guests who had just had magical experiences in a whole new world, and guides and drivers who were honored to show off that world, and valued by their employers for doing so. The vibes were as warm as the color of the sky. We raised our glasses and toasted to a trip through the jungle we’ll never forget. Salud.

Aqua Expeditions Excursions

Aqua Expeditions Excursions

Aqua Expeditions Excursions

I was a guest of Aqua Expeditions in order to promote the cruise line via various freelancing outlets. They did not request that I write a positive review, in fact they did not request that I cover the experience via Alex in Wanderland at all.

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37 Comments...
  • Ashley
    October 31 2013

    Great post! I love your photos. Have you ever taken a photography class? Do you have any tips for taking amazing photos?

    • Alex
      November 1 2013

      Thank you so much Ashley, that is so kind! I have a visual design degree which required some photography credits, and of course lots and lots and lots of practice! I’d have to think to come up with some tips… mostly it’s just intuitive, I think. But you’ve given me possible inspiration for a new post!

  • Laura
    October 31 2013

    This cruise sounds like heaven. That photo of the children in their village should be in National Geographic!
    Laura recently posted..Friday Roundup: October 25, 2013

    • Alex
      November 1 2013

      Thanks Laura! The best thing about that photo was it was a total one-take. I crouched down, saw the sun beam, snapped and prayed it was good as I didn’t want to sit there like a paparazzi. So glad it turned out like it did!

  • Shaun
    October 31 2013

    Not cheap for three days but getting a chance to explore so many aspects of the Amazon is a great opportunity.

    Kick ass pic of the croc’s eye…
    Shaun recently posted..Traveling Back In Time – Edinburgh Castle

    • Alex
      November 1 2013

      Thanks! That photo made bringing my long lens worth it!

  • Erica
    October 31 2013

    So cute how your group adopted you 🙂

    I’m in love with the picture of the kids standing outside the wood house!
    Erica recently posted..A Very Happy Halloween

    • Alex
      November 1 2013

      Thanks Erica! I loved my little group on the boat 🙂

  • Amanda
    October 31 2013

    Gorgeous photos Alex!! Sounds like a cool trip. I did a similar one in Borneo but it was very backpacker/roughing it… I think I would definitely enjoy doing a luxury one as well 🙂
    Amanda recently posted..Dealing with guilt in Africa

    • Alex
      November 1 2013

      Ah, I’ve got to get to Borneo someday soon! When I do, I’m heading to you for advice!

  • Jade
    October 31 2013

    I know quite a few people who dislike the idea of organised trips, mainly due to the worry of your fellow group members, but I think it is a great way to meet people who may not have otherwise- like you did on The Aria!
    I am still in touch with the friends I made on a group tour in Peru and I hope you can do so too 🙂
    I wish this amazing experience didn’t have such a hefty price tag! Although, if I did have the money, I am sure it would be worth it ten times over!

    • Alex
      November 1 2013

      I definitely can understand the wince at first glance of the price. But when you’re on the boat and (1) meet the enormous staff and realize how well they are being cared for (including full health insurance for themselves and their families, a rarity in Peru from what I understand) and (2) learn about all the non-profit projects that Aqua Expeditions supports, and (3) see their commitment to using the best local and fair-trade materials, it starts to make a little more sense! I think this would be a great honeymoon trip 🙂

  • TammyOnTheMove
    October 31 2013

    Wow, I love your photos. It seems a bit pricey, but it really looks worth it.
    TammyOnTheMove recently posted..Climbing Cotopaxi – And why you shouldn’t mess with your wife when she has altitude sickness

    • Alex
      November 1 2013

      Yes, this is definitely a special occasion trip — wouldn’t this make the best honeymoon, or special anniversary sail? Love it!

  • Rika | Cubicle Throwdown
    November 1 2013

    I know these posts are about a luxury river cruise in the Amazon, and the excursions from the boat, but honestly these posts don’t feel like that at all. I think they are some of your best!! Also, I found the same boa chilling on my scooter this morning when I went to hop on to go to work. I wish your guides would have been there to wrangle him. I tried to grab him but he hissed so I had to bat him off with a stick 🙁
    Rika | Cubicle Throwdown recently posted..Rain, rain, rain = new look!

    • Alex
      November 1 2013

      Thanks Rika! And love your story about the boa… the life of an expat!

  • Breanna
    November 1 2013

    This trip down the amazon looks amazing. For some strange reason I have always wanted to see the amazon and your account of it has further intrigued me!

    • Alex
      November 1 2013

      Thanks Breanna! I hope you make it there someday soon to see it for yourself 🙂

  • Camels & Chocolate
    November 1 2013

    These photos are AMAZING. I particularly like the snake ones even though I don’t particularly like snakes =)

    If ever I opted to do the Amazon, this is definitely the route I’d take!
    Camels & Chocolate recently posted..Photo Friday: Nashville, Tennessee

    • Alex
      November 3 2013

      Thanks Kristin! Between Semester at Sea and the small ship you took through the Caribbean I think of you as a “quirky cruiser.” And this would fit the bill!

  • Federico
    November 2 2013

    One fantastic trip indeed, I can imagine how exciting it was all! A trip with style for sure, how about that sunset?

    • Alex
      November 3 2013

      Thanks Federico! I like that line… “a trip with style” 🙂

  • Melanie Fontaine
    November 2 2013

    Wow, the pictures in this post are so wonderfully beautiful! I especially love the picture of the crocodile – great shot! 🙂 You definitely had some great wildlife sightings so far! 🙂
    Melanie Fontaine recently posted..Exploring Madgalen College in Oxford

    • Alex
      November 3 2013

      I feel so lucky! And I can’t wait for my return to the jungle in early December… Puerto Maldonado is mean to be even better for sightings!

  • Erica
    November 3 2013

    I would definitely say that your experience was much different than my 3-day $80 version lol! They made US look for the anacondas.

    Love the photos. This looks FAB.
    Erica recently posted..Food Truck Friday: Oyama

    • Alex
      November 4 2013

      Ha! I’m not sure how good of an anaconda wrangler I’d make… Was your jungle trip in Peru? I hear they are super cheap in Ecuador and Bolivia. I can’t get enough of the region, so I might have to do a super cheap version too to compare! (I did a midrange version as well on this same trip.)

  • Ian
    November 4 2013

    Great post, Alex – would seriously consider this trip for a splurge as I’m not sure I could cope with roughing it along the Amazon!

    • Alex
      November 4 2013

      Thanks Ian! This is definitely the way to see the Amazon in luxury!

  • Sam
    November 4 2013

    Oh my god. The snakes. No. No. I couldn’t. No. … No.

    Everything else , yes!

    But the snakes. No. No. No. No.

    No. I’d have just lay in the fetal position and sobbed like that time I saw one outside my house in Tao. Boat looks rad though. Lucky girl.

    • Alex
      November 7 2013

      I was telling that story to someone recently! I wish we had a photo. Island life, eh?

  • Abby
    November 5 2013

    Girl, you are too much. As are your photos — gorgeous! These guys look amazing, and I know I’d feel so safe with them. Sounds like an amazing company, and I will definitely turn to them if I ever make it to Peru. Am planning another trip to South America for early next year, so we will see! I have a few other friends looking for trips like this one, so I will pass it around. Good find!
    Abby recently posted..Daydream of the Week: Victoria

    • Alex
      November 7 2013

      Oh Abby, I would love to see you on this boat! Thanks for the kind words!

  • Liz
    November 7 2013

    I’m praying and hoping this is not the cruise I passed up but fear that it is. What an amazing experience and beautiful views! I’m so happy you got to spend it with such lovely people. I will not say no again!

    • Alex
      November 8 2013

      Your fears are confirmed 🙂 Next time!

  • kiara gallop
    December 11 2013

    Wow I love your photos, you’ve totally sold an Amazon adventure to me! I’m travelling to Peru next April, and although this cruise is totally out of my price range, I’m aware there are cheaper options. My question is, which would you recommend for a more authentic Amazon experience, the jungle stay with Viator, or the cruise? (forgetting about the luxury element if you can!) I cannot afford both but I desperately want to do some trekking in the jungle, see some wildlife/flora/fauna, possibly some indigenous tribes and learn about how naturally occurring materials in the Amazon are used in every day life, and also some time on the river itself witnessing the sights and sounds as they pass.
    Many thanks 🙂

    • Alex
      December 11 2013

      That is a tough question, but I think it’s important to remember that whether you do a boat trip or a lodge stay, both with have elements of land and water — so you really can’t go wrong. That said, you DO spend more time on the boat in a boat trip (duh) and you’ll spend a bit more time doing forest walks when you’re staying a lodge. It sounds like from your wish list, a lodge stay might be more appropriate for you! Happy travels, Kiara!

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