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On the morning of my third day in the Cordilleras, I jolted awake and rolled over to look out the window. Had I dreamed how beautiful it was? The view that answered me back assured me it was very much reality. Despite, or perhaps even partly because of, the total isolation from the outside world, I was sad to be leaving that day. But I had solid plans to meet my friend Heather in Sagada the next afternoon and with no internet and incredibly spotty phone service, I wouldn’t have been able to contact her even if I wanted to. So I had to make the most of the little time I had left.

Palm Tree, Philippines

Rice Terraces, Philippines

After breakfast (130 php/3.20 usd), the guide that G.I. Joe and I hired the day before, Frankie, came by to see if we were still interested in going to “Best Viewpoint.” Tourism is in its most rudimentary form here and there are no maps or brochures to go along with these offers — just a name and a price and whatever supplementary information you can pry out using interrogation methods gleaned from a decade of watching Law and Order reruns. From my investigation our conversation, I understood that it would take about an hour to stroll up to this spectacular viewpoint — what a nice morning stroll! We determined that from there we would cross over the mountain ridge toward Bagaan, where the path meets up with a road and we could catch a Jeepney back to Banaue. It meant we had to carry all of our stuff with us, but it was the most direct route back to where we needed to be.

We set off at 8:30am in order to try to beat the heat. I requested that before we set off we take a small detour back into the village, as it had been raining the day before when we reached it. Frankie didn’t look thrilled but trotted down ahead of us anyway. I was beside myself with happiness. The sky was blue, the clouds were fluffy, the rice fields were a lush green and I was getting to see and photograph it all. There were tiny provincial churches…

Church in Batad, Philippines

Church in Batad, Philippines

Native houses and structures that I marveled were built so far from any kind of road….

House in Batad, Philippines

House in Batad, Philippines

House in Batad, Philippines

And a small menagerie of dogs and roosters patrolling the village…

Puppy in Batad, Philippines

Puppy in Batad, Philippines

Chickens in Batad, Philippines

Chickens in Batad, Philippines

When the boys finally insisted camera time was over, I said a silent goodbye the beautiful rice terraces that had made me feel inspired in a way I hadn’t experienced in a long time.

Rice Terraces in Batad, Philippines

And then the true hiking began. Well. I guess it’s a good thing Frankie didn’t give us a more accurate description of what we’d be doing — climbing the freaking Filipino Ben Nevis, a 1,300km MOUNTAIN! — because I would not have signed on. I don’t know what happened to that easy hour stroll to a nice viewpoint, but I spent the next two and a half hours on a hard vertical ascent. I was actually crying toward the end, though luckily no one was the wiser because I was sweating so profusely that a few tears just blended right in. I normally consider myself a fairly tough chick but in this situation I think I was more frustrated than anything — I was totally mentally unprepared for such a strenuous climb, and on top of it my back was breaking from the weight of my overnight bag.

So yeah, some tears happened.

Hiking in Batad, Philippines

Hiking in Batad, Philippines

At the top of the mountain I learned a tough lesson — in the Philippines, one should simply just accept that they will never have even the tiniest inkling about what is going on, ever, and one should just learn to go with the flow and deal with it. Despite the extensive conversation the night before, from the top of this mountain that I hadn’t realized I was climbing, I also realized we were not taking the route I thought we were taking — rather than passing over the ridge we were going back down the way we came, which meant we had unnecessarily carried all our gear up a mountain, and had tacked a few hours onto our day.

I put in my iPod for ten minutes and just let myself fume before shaking it off and remembering that while the guides have excellent English they are still bamboozled by our Western desire for frivolous information regarding time, distance and route when signing on for a day of hiking. And okay, the view — peeking down into the bowl of terraces from high in the mountains above —  had been pretty damn amazing after all.

Rice Terraces of Batad, Philippines

Batad
Batad

Rice Terraces of Batad

The new plan — as far as I understood it, and I had learned to put very little stock in that — was to head more or less back to where we started in the village. From there, Frankie would leave us (we didn’t have him take up all the way due to budget reasons), draw us a map, and we would follow the mostly level route to a random spot in the road, where Frankie would arrange for a trike driver to pick us up and bring us the rest of the way to Banaue. Brilliant!

Now comes the part of the post where I almost died.

One moment I was stepping down the terrace stairs — basically stones jutting out the side of the wall in a diagonal line — and the next I was suspended at an 80 degree angle above a 100 foot ravine, being held up by a few strong stalks of bamboo. Somehow I kept totally calm as the bamboo started to creak, and yelled out to the Frankie and Joe for help (I was bringing up the rear of this particular hiking party). I could tell the branch I was holding with my left hand was keeping me the most stable, so I made the terrifying decision to swing my right hand up and allow the two guys to completely pull me back up to safety while trying to find footing on the rocks. Amazingly, I didn’t have a scratch or even lose the waterbottle out of the pocket of my backpack — it did take me a good 20 minutes to get my heartrate back to normal though. Hiking on the rice terraces is sometimes terrifying — you’re basically stepping along a 6″ wide wall of mud and if you fall in one direction you’re going to drown in shallow rice muck and if you fall in the other you’re going to plummet to your death. There were moments where the wall was so steep and deep that I more or less crawled on all fours. I tried to ask Frankie about the frequency of injuries for tourists hiking here but he brushed me off. After my experience I was even more curious, but also weighing the fact that I frequently trip over my own feet, so coordination isn’t exactly my forte.

Hiking in Batad, Philippines

Rice Terraces of Batad, Philippines

Eventually it was time for Frankie to leave us, and so while I Steri-pened some drinking water from a stream he drew us a rudimentary map. I casually asked how far we were — at the top of the mountain he told us we were two hours from the road so it should have been about 45 minutes. “One hour. Two hour maybe” he said. UM OKAY I’LL JUST LET THAT ONE GO SINCE I’M BEING SO ZEN AND LAID BACK NOW. It was in fact about two hours, and involved lots of asking each other “do you think we are really going the right way?” and one major fork that was not included whatsoever on our map — I’ll just go ahead and say that I don’t think my guide has a future in cartography. Still, he did end up carrying my bag down from the mountain and so in addition to my share of his guide fee (400 php/9.84 usd), I did throw him a tip (100 php/2.46 usd).

On the plus side, the scenery was jaw-dropping — endless green mountain ranges punctuated by remote villages and flashes of terracing. Finally we reached the road, where a trike was meant to be waiting for us. Shockingly it did not materialize and so after a deep breath and a self-administered dose of Toughen Up, we started the walk to the next village. Then something magical happened. Within a mile a truck stopped and let us hop on the back for a free ride back to Banaue — an amazing bonus in light of my budget crunch. Bouncing along in the bed of the truck I turned on my iPhone to look at the time. We had been in non stop motion since 8:30am — and it was then 4:00pm.

Hiking in Batad, Philippines

Hitchhiking in Batad, Philippines

What an adventure it was! On the negative side, my calves felt like someone had been ripping them open with pliers and I was quite certain I wouldn’t be able to walk the next day. Another downside, G.I. Joe and I had spent the last two hours of hiking butting heads — but I tried to remind myself that he had after all saved my life. As a final indignity, it started raining for the last ten minutes of the drive and then I was forced to shower with cold water upon my return to Banaue.

On the plus side, Batad might just be the most beautiful place I’ve ever been. I left feeling inspired, awed, and a smidge proud of myself for taking it all on. It was on of the highlights of all my adventures in Southeast Asia. And one of the cheapest! After dinner (150 php/3.69 usd), hot chocolate (35 php/0.86 usd) and accommodation for the night (300 php/7.38 usd), my grand total for day three in the Cordilleras was 1115 pesos, or $27.43 dollars. In three days I had spent 3,408 pesos, or just $83.83 dollars — I had more than enough out of my original $100 to get me to Sagada, considering public transport via Jeepney worked out to just $5.

There’s no doubt, it was worth every penny — at twice the price.

The Rice Terraces of Batad

The Rice Terraces of Batad

I’d love to hear about some of your own hiking horror stories in the comments.

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27 Comments...
  • Laryssa
    May 18 2013

    Loved theses posts Alex! True adventure. I admire your ability to go to the far-flung corners of the world, I think I’d be terrified!
    Laryssa recently posted..The Truth about Being a Production Assistant: How Much Money Will I Make?

    • Alex
      May 18 2013

      Believe me, I was a little nervous myself! Remember the song I posted in the “Welcome to the Philippines” video? The line I love the most is the one that goes, “The fear has gripped me but, here I go…”

  • Melanie Fontaine
    May 18 2013

    Funnily enough, your experience – down to the near falling into death – greatly reminded me of my own experience hiking at the Isle of Skye in Scotland: Crazy beautiful views, but tiny paths that just aren’t a good idea if you’re wearing a backpack… But I’m glad you’re okay! 🙂

    I’ve also learned to not believe information regarding lengths of hikes – they’re always off! 🙂

    xx
    Melanie
    Melanie Fontaine recently posted..Scotland: Isle Inchcailloch at Loch Lomond

    • Alex
      May 18 2013

      Oh, I’m forever heartbroken that I didn’t get to the Isle of Skye when I spent that summer in Scotland. Perhaps I’ll go back someday 🙂

  • Chris
    May 18 2013

    Looks like an incredible part of the world complimented more so by cute looking animals. Ha.

    I think your last picture should have an eplilepsy warning by the way!!
    Chris recently posted..5 tantalising Thai foods to tickle your taste buds.

    • Alex
      May 18 2013

      Yikes — I just went back and looked and something seems to be off with the .gif! It’s definitely not supposed to go that fast. Will have to fix it!

  • jessie
    May 18 2013

    Wow! Those rice terraces look sooo beautiful! Though it must have been slightly irritating at the time, I find that not knowing what’s going on is such a gift. Just to be there and totally present. Thanks for sharing I’d love to go there sometime!
    jessie recently posted..Action and Adventure in Hoi An

    • Alex
      May 18 2013

      Ha, you are definitely right Jessie… I’ve never been very good at being zen. I like to mentally prepare for things but should be open to the idea that I can’t always do that. And in my defense, I was mostly irritated by having carried all my things with me unnecessarily 🙂

  • Linda
    May 18 2013

    I can just imagine the frustration, but the pictures are beautiful and the story is fascinating (as I sit at my desk). Those rooster photos are really good too.

    • Alex
      May 18 2013

      Thanks Linda! At the time, when I was hot and tired and my bag felt like it was a million pounds it was really frustrating. But now that I have the beautiful photos and the memories it really doesn’t seem so bad 🙂 I love that little gift that perspective gives…

  • Matthew Karsten
    May 18 2013

    Loved the photos and glad you survived the hike. It looks beautiful up there! 😀
    Matthew Karsten recently posted..Rappelling at Railay [PHOTO]

    • Alex
      May 18 2013

      Thanks Matt! I think of you as quite the adventurer so I know that if I’ve impressed you, then my work here is done 🙂

  • TammyOnTheMove
    May 23 2013

    What an adventure. Well done for trekking for such a long period of time. That is hardcore, but having GI Joe with you must have helped sporn you on probably. This place looks truly beautiful I MUST MUST go there!
    TammyOnTheMove recently posted..Can an Englishman fall in love with Germany?

    • Alex
      May 23 2013

      Thanks Tammy! Yes it’s good to have someone to be a little competitive with 🙂 And the beautiful scenery is a pretty amazing distraction!

  • Kristen Wiggins
    May 23 2013

    I can’t commend you enough for your braveness! This reminds me of the mountain hike I did in Thailand…the views were killer but the inclines? And the fact that one slip to the side could lead to tragedy? Whooo man.
    You are a survivor!
    Beautiful photos, as always.

    • Alex
      May 24 2013

      Thanks Kristen! Which mountain did you climb in Thailand? I never did much hiking in Thailand and always wish I did!

  • Marie
    August 24 2015

    Thanks so much for all these useful informations ! The Philippines look incredible and I’m currently planning on visiting this magic country. Your blog is amazing, please keep travelling haha 🙂 Quick question for you; in Banaue, Batad or Sagada did you ever felt safe leaving your big backpack bag at the hostels you were seeping while leaving for the day to explore the area or did you always kept all your belongings with you ?
    Thanks a lot you’re such an inspiring person!!!

    • Alex
      August 26 2015

      Hey Marie, I left my stuff in my hotel rooms while out hiking. I recommend a Pacsafe or a Kensington laptop lock if you’re worried — check my obsessions page for more info! Enjoy 🙂

  • Yaya
    January 31 2016

    Hi Alex – if you don’t mind me asking what hotel did you guys stay in at Batad? I think you said it was $7.38 per night.

    • Alex
      February 1 2016

      Sorry Yaya, it was a no-name place with no signage, phone number, or obviously, website. Just show up and ask around.

  • Lillian
    June 9 2016

    Hey! im going to banue and batad next month and we are arriving on the overnight bus and plan to go to batad the same day, stay 1 night and then go back to banue to get an overnight bus back to manila that night because we have a flight the next morning… do you think this is possible? we are both pretty fit and happy to hike but im just worried about timing… also how did you find the buses? did they run on time? thank you!! xx

    • Alex
      June 10 2016

      I have to say this seems pretty risky to me. You probably will be able to get to Batad the same day without issue but getting back in time for a night bus if you want to see anything of the area is going to be super tricky. Nothing much runs on time in the Philippines 🙂 You’ll thank yourself a million times over for adding in another day.

  • Mick
    October 19 2017

    This is on my bucket list when I go back to the Philippines next month! Any plans to go back?
    Mick recently posted..8 Restaurants and Cafés to Try in Le Marais

    • Alex
      October 21 2017

      Indeed! I’ll be announcing my next trip to the Philippines soon… stay tuned 🙂

  • Ashlee
    August 22 2018

    This looks incredible. What time of year were you there?
    Thanks so much!

    • Alex
      October 10 2018

      Hey Ashlee! I believe it was March? It was indeed incredible!

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